Nadir Jeevanjee
\nɐɗɪɹ dʒivɪndʒi\

Profile pic

I study the physics of clouds, radiation, and climate, using a hierarchy of approaches ranging from pencil-and-paper theory to comprehensive computer simulations. I am currently an Associate Research Scholar in the Princeton AOS program, and am also affiliated with GFDL. Prior to this I held post-doctoral positions in Princeton Geosciences as well as Princeton AOS, and I got my PhD in 2016 from UC Berkeley working with David Romps.

I have a keen interest in communicating climate science to other scientists as well as the public, both on my own (see the lectures page) and as a member of Climate Up Close. Before turning to climate science I also studied mathematical physics for many years, during which I authored the textbook An Introduction to Tensors and Group Theory for Physicists. See the book page for more information.

I welcome correspondence at nadirj@princeton.edu.


Happenings

Jan. 2020   Two papers on radiative transfer, "Simple Spectral Models for Atmospheric Radiative Cooling," and "On the Cooling-to-Space Approximation", led by myself and in collaboration with Stephan Fueglistaler, are now published in JAS.
[article webpage] [pdf] [article webpage] [pdf]

Jan. 2020   I was interviewed for another story about climate scientists flying less, this one on Philadelphia public radio WHYY. Other content on this topic can be found in the May 2019 post below.

Dec. 2019   Two papers on entrainment in dry convection, "Entrainment in Resolved, Dry Thermals" and "Buoyancy-driven Entrainment in Dry Thermals", led by my collaborator Daniel Lecoanet and student Brett McKim respectively, are now published.   [article webpage] [pdf] [article webpage] [pdf] [animations]

Nov. 2019   The paper "Climatology explains intermodel spread in tropical upper tropospheric cloud and relative humidity response to greenhouse warming", led by Stephen Po-Chedley and co-authored by myself and others, is now published in Geophysical Research Letters.   [article webpage] [pdf]

Aug. 2019   I was interviewed, along with many others, for a story in The Chronicle of Higher Education about climate science and skepticism here in Princeton. [pdf]

Aug. 2019   I spent a week in central Pennsylvania performing climate science outreach with Climate Up Close.   [TV coverage] [Podcast]

Aug. 2019   Xin Rong Chua, working with her PhD advisor Yi Ming and myself, published a paper entitled "Investigating the Fast Response of Precipitation Intensity and Boundary Layer Temperature to Atmospheric Heating Using a Cloud-Resolving Model" in Geophysical Research Letters.   [article webpage] [pdf] [si]

May 2019   I was interviewed, along with Kim Cobb and Peter Kalmus, for a story in Science about climate scientists flying less. I discuss my own experience in further detail at noflyclimatesci.org.

April 2019   I discussed climate science at Rob Socolow's retirement symposium (w/Isaac Held and Tapio Schneider).   [slides] [video (excerpt)] [video (full)] [press]

Mar. 2019   I presented on "Climate science: how do we know what we know?" at Bronx Community College in New York City, organized by Professor Monika sikand.

Feb. 2019   A second paper on anvil clouds, entitled "FAT or FiTT: Are anvil clouds or the tropopause temperature-invariant?", led by colleague Jacob T. Seeley, also now published in Geophysical Research Letters.   [article webpage] [pdf] [si]

Jan. 2019   I spoke at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as well as Princeton University on "simple models of the H2O and CO2 greenhouse effects".   [slides] [video]

Jan. 2019   Our work entitled "Formation of tropical anvil clouds by slow evaporation", led by colleague Jacob T. Seeley, now published in Geophysical Research Letters.   [article webpage] [pdf] [si]

Dec. 2018   I presented on "Climate science: how do we know what we know?" at Hunter College in New York City, organized by Professor Randye Rutberg.

Oct. 2018   My work entitled "Mean precipitation change from a deepening troposphere", done in collaboration with David Romps, was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.   [article webpage] [pdf] [si]